January 5, 2017 Vincent Vis

QDR Series – STEP 1

The Queda de Rins (Elbow lever), or QDR as popularized by Ido Portal, are a fantastic – and trendy – foundation which can unlock a wealth of other patterns and more complex moves around dynamic variations of the elbow lever. We will examine in a series of blogs the tools and drills that lead to the QDR circles.

I found through practice and teaching that QDR can become challenging for people who don’t have any background in breakdance or capoeira – and sometimes the most efficient way is not be stubborn with the drills you’re practicing.

I have compiled the exercises I have designed to successfully teach QDR variations and will be group ing them in a 10-step program.

I’ll be posting them one by one  – If QDR circles are a goal for you, or if you want to explore dynamics variations of the queda de rins, read diligently,  and practice with patience.

Stay tuned.


10 STEP PROGRAM:

STEP 1 : PREPPING THE WRISTS

STEP 2 : INTRODUCING THE ELBOW LEVER

STEP 3; DEVELOPING THE SAFETY MECHANISM

STEP 4 : ADDING DYNAMISM TO THE QDR

STEP 5: WORKING ON THE START/END POSITION: THE LOW BRIDGE

STEP 6: SLIDING HALF ROTATION

STEP 7: HALF ROTATION FROM SQUAT to BRIDGE

STEP 8: HALF ROTATION FROM BRIDGE to SQUAT

STEP 9: PUTTING QDR CIRCLES TOGETHER

STEP 10: REFINING THE DETAILS


STEP 1 : PREPPING THE WRISTS

the-qdr-series-1

Just like the handstands: one of the main errors people commit when flirting with the queda de rins – and it is hard to resist the temptation when our social media feeds are flooded with them – is to ignore wrist prep.

Assuming your wrists are ready – especially if you are not someone who spends a good 2 hours per day on their hands – could be a mistake with a hard price to pay: longevity.

Nobody likes to do prep work. It’s boring, but it has to be done. In the elbow lever, not only will you have to hold the vast majority of, if not all, your bodyweight on one arm, but the wrist angle will be reduced – increasing the stress on the joint. Let’s have a closer look at the hand placement in both a handstand and a meia lua de rins to understand what I’m referring to:

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Please note while at it that this kind of reduced angles between the arm and the hand has raised some concerns anatomically – and as usual everything is hardly black or white.

Being comfortable in that kind of angles – let alone being prepared to absorb an impact on that kind of angles and to deal with less than perfect placements –  asks for some intelligent prehabilitation.

I’ll keep including specific prep drills in the different trainings that will posted in the context of the QDR Series.

Meanwhile, the first step consists in including the following specific prep drills in your own workouts for a couple of days/weeks.

Program:

Video

Click on the video above to see all the drills performed.

Mixed angles hand to hand

From a kneeling down position, load one hand at a time and change the angle of your hands everytime. Make sure to work on the spicier angles as you go on and to pay attention to your eblow – I’d advise you to play with fully locked/bent elbows and notice what challenges you. The very same drill can be performed from a straddle split or a crab stance to change the load.

Recommended set/rep: 3 – 5 min total

Straight elbow sitting stretch

From the same position, curl your toes and sit on your heels while trying to keep the palm of your hands fully flat on the ground. Don’t cheat by lifting the hand! Go back and forth instead of staying still (dynamic stretching)

Recommended set/rep: 10 – 20 reps

Planche leans – 45 °C out

From a push up position (no sagging hips please), lean over your hands – your fingers are at a 45 °C angle from the lines of your shoulders – by pushing on your toes, and go back to the initial position without breaking form.

Recommended set/rep: 10 – 20 reps, slow

Planche leans – straight

Same as above, but keep your fingers in line with your shoulders, pointing forward.

Recommended set/rep: 10 – 20 reps, slow

Planche leans – 45°C in

Same as above, but your index fingers are facing each other.

Recommended set/rep: 10 – 20 reps, slow

Easy (Baby) QDR – progressive load

From a kneeling down position, place both hands parallel in front of you. Bend one elbow as you are bringing your head to the ground looking at the opposite direction. Sit the elbow on the ribcage or below, and transfer the weight from the feet to the hands. The weight on the head should be minimal.

Recommended set/rep: 5 reps each hand, 2-3 sets

Easy QDR – straddle legs

From the baby QDR position, with one knee down: lift the support knee and slide on your feet to straddle your legs. Stay a couple of seconds, and come back in the same way.

Recommended set/rep: 5 reps each side

Easy QDR hold – straddle legs (1/2 arms)

From the straddle position, superload your support arm by staying longer and longer and/or adding leverage with the other arm.

Recommended set/rep: 5 reps each side, hold of 3 – 10 sec

Easy QDR- boggie woggie (1/2 arms)

This one is one of my favourites. The goal is to assume the Baby QDR position (without or with a knee down depending on your level) and do micro-movements to load your hand in a dynamic fashion – mimicing what will happen in more complex variations we will study.

Recommended set/rep: 3-10 sec, 1-3 sets

QDR contemporary slide

Using the knee (or just the feet if you are strong enough), the goal is to support yourself as much as possible through your hands so that your legs become light and you can move your feet – either on a straight line from right to left or drawing half circles with your feet.

Recommended set/rep: 5-15 sec, 1-3 sets

QDR – one arm assisted half flexion

More than a strict one arm push-up, the goal here is to overload the wrist and elbow – if you shake, it could be even better. Don’t make it a push up exercise – that’s why I’d invite you to put your knee down as you push up just like I do in the video.

Recommended set/rep: 3-6 reps each arm

QDR – knee slide in

This is a contemporary floorwork drill I use in my classes that builds on the motion with the knee, starting with you are asked to do with the QDR one arm flexion. Sit your knee down once set up, slide the knee in and finish in a shin box, holding yourself as much as possible with your support arm.

Recommended set/rep: 5-10 reps each arm


Spicing things up – the QDR chain of difficulty

When it comes to QDR variations, most drills can be spiced up removing the amount of support you allow yourself to use.

Note that for aesthetics purposes, you may want to use one specific arm over the other, leave the head free, put the knee down, etc.

You basically have three factors to play with: adding these points of support in will make your life easier and allow you to refine momentum generation or technique – removing them will make it harder.

Legs: two knees – One knees – Two feet – One feet – No feet

Arms : two hands – one hand

Head: head down – no head


I hope this first tutorial helped you.

Any question, leave me a comment or send me an email.

I am working on the next one 🙂